Passover 2

Garden of Gethsemane

The Unattractive Servant

As The Passover Lamb looks into the Gethsemane skies, the Lord’s peace offering is fully aware that His body was made for the atonement for the sins of the world. Our Lord enters the garden where He often prays with His faithful companions.
Luke 22:39 And He came out and went, as was His habit, to the Mount of Olives; and the disciples followed Him. When He arrived at the place [called Gethsemane], He said to them, “Pray continually that you may not fall into temptation.”

The Bible Dictionary Definition for Temptation

3986. πειρασμός peirasmós; gen. peirasmoú, masc. noun from peirázō (G3985), to make trial of, try, tempt. Trial, temptation, a putting to the test, spoken of persons only. When God is the agent, peirasmós is for the purpose of proving someone, never for the purpose of causing him to fall. If it is the devil who tempts, then it is for the purpose of causing one to fall.
(I) Generally, trial of one’s character (1 Pet. 4:12, “to try [or prove] you”). By implication, trial of one’s virtue, temptation, solicitation to sin, especially from Satan (Luke 4:13; 1 Tim… Complete Word Study Bible Dictionary

The Bible speaks of Jesus’ disciples, but there is another group of faithful attendants present that is rarely appreciated.
Bible students don’t say much about Christ’s secondary comrades, but King David identified with them in Psalms 52:8.

First of all, these companions are very unattractive and not much to look at; however, their beauty is their tenacity in which their faithfulness is only surpassed by that of Adonai, God of Israel. For example, they were in the garden every time Jesus prayed.

The unattractive servants
King David says in Psalms 52:8

Psalms 52:8
But I am like an olive tree, thriving in the house of God.
I will always trust in God’s unfailing love.
I will praise you forever, O God,
for what you have done.
I will trust in your good name
in the presence of your faithful people.

According to the Easton’s Bible Dictionary
The oldest olive-trees in the country are those which are enclosed in the Garden of Gethsemane. I don’t believe Easton’s Dictionary committee is saying that these are the same olive trees where The Messiah prayed. But where do these trees get a source of vitality that extends their lives?

The two “witnesses” mentioned in Rev 11:4 are spoken of as “two olive trees standing before the God of the earth.” (Comp. Zech 4:3 11-14.)

When we try to understand the sacred loyalty of God while comparing His devotion to the human species, there is little to associate with His trustworthiness as we have with the mysterious olive tree. This character of an olive tree becomes more apparent when the reader understands that the Messiah is the one who anoints, furthermore, before there is an anointing there has to be a crushing of the olive in the olive press.

 

The Tender Plant

A tender plant
Isaiah 53:2 For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him.
He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were our faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not.

Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted.
But he was wounded for our transgressions, he was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon him; and with his stripes we are healed.

The Hebrew word for “was bruised” is “daka” the Lord’s will to crush the Servant. God pours out His wrath against sin while at the same time, offering a covenant for peace.

H1792. דָּכָא dāḵā’: A verb meaning to crush, to beat down, to bruise, to oppress. The Hebrew word is often used in a poetic or figurative sense. Eliphaz spoke of those who lived in houses of clay, whose foundations were crushed easily (Job 4:19). The psalmist prayed that the king would crush an oppressor (Ps. 72:4) and accused the wicked of crushing the Lord’s people (Ps. 94:5). The wise man exhorted others not to crush the needy in court (Prov. 22:22). Isaiah said that it was the Lord’s will to crush the Servant (Isa. 53:10…)

When the sinner sees this anointed King, who left His Throne in Heaven to be made humble, scorned and despised; the lost will come to His aid and thank Him for His grace and treat this King with love and respect. This act of God leaves little room for Satan’s excuse for rebellious and arrogant behavior amongst angels and people who reject the Lamb of God.

The Hare

Eoster Easter Eastre Ostara Equinox Moon Goddess Germanic gods and goddesses Teutonic gods and goddesses Anglo-Saxon gods and goddesses.

 

The Hare

(Heb. ‘arnebeth) was prohibited as food according to the Mosaic law (Lev 11:6 Deut 14:7, “because he cheweth the cud, but divideth not the hoof.” The habit of this animal is to grind its teeth and move its jaw as if it actually chewed the cud. But, like the cony (q.v.), it is not a ruminant with four stomachs, but a rodent like a squirrel, rat, etc. Moses speaks of it according to appearance. It is interdicted because, though apparently chewing the cud, it did not divide the hoof.
There are two species in Syria, (1) the Lepus Syriacus or Syrian hare, which is like the English hare; and (2) the Lepus Sinaiticus, or hare of the desert. No rabbits are found in Syria.

In the Lutheran translation of the Bible, the Hebrew word “arneweth” is translated as ‘hare’. This seems to be the correct translation. The Hebrew word “arneweth” is connected with the Arcadian word “annabu”, which means “jumper”. Besides this, we find in the Latin Vulgate the word ‘hare’ translated as the name of the species “lepus”. In the Talmud, we can find more evidence that “arneweth” is a hare. The orthodox Jews always translated “arneweth” as a hare. And finally we find confirmation in the Jerusalem Bible-Zoo that the “arneweth” is a hare.

There are two kinds of hare in the Holy Land – lepus syriacus and lepus aegtiacus. There are only small differences between these two kinds of hare and rabbits. A hare is born with open eyes and a full coat of fur; and a hare also has a different tail than the rabbit. However, their feeding habits are similar.
The Bible also uses the Hebrew word “gera” to describe a hare. In most English Bible translations the expression “cheweth the cud” is used. According to the Talmud the hare is a ruminant (Hul.59a). The Targum considers the hare to be “an animal that chews the cud.” (B.Kam 28b).

The hare does not have a stomach with three or four chambers, as is typical for all animals that chew the cud, however, it chews the cellulose food twice, so that the nutrients which were not consumed the first time will be digested. The stomach of the hare is different to that of cattle which have three or four chambers, however, it functions in a similar manner.
The hare excretes two different kinds of droppings. In addition to normal excrement, it passes another kind of “pellet” called Caecotroph, which the hare eats again. This type of dropping is usually passed during the night or in the early hours of the morning; an average person would not get to see this procedure. As soon as the Caecotroph is thoroughly chewed and swallowed it is collected in the stomach to be digested a second time.

The Caecotroph is produced in the Caecum (intestine) and is rich in Vitamin B, especially Vitamin B1. This is important for the hare’s nourishment. The hare does not just chew the food twice, but as in ruminating cloven-hoofed animals, bacteria breaks down the cellulose. The Bible, therefore, makes no mistake in stating that the hare chews the cud, as this is now scientifically proven.

In Leviticus 11:6 it was forbidden to eat hare. This commandment was probably given because blood parasites could be transferred through the handling of hare carcasses. This hygiene rule was far ahead of its time.
Translated from the German: “Der Hase”
https://www.cai.org/bible-studies/harelord